Create an Account
username: password:
 
  MemeStreams Logo

Information Warfare for The People!

search

sponsored links

popular topics
Miscellaneous

browse topics
Arts
Business
Games
Health and Wellness
Home and Garden
Miscellaneous
Current Events
Recreation
Local Information
Science
Society
Sports
Technology

 

MemeStreams combines the power of weblogs and social networking. The members of our community work together to find interesting content on the web. As you use the site, it learns your interests, and provides new links it thinks you will like. Read more about MemeStreams or create an account!

Wikimedia v. NSA: Standing and the Fight for Free Speech and Privacy | Just Security

When I first saw this suit I ignored it, but it may have more merit than I originally thought.

the government itself has now acknowledged and confirmed many of the key facts about the NSA’s upstream surveillance, including the fact that it conducts suspicionless searches of the contents of communications for information “about” its targets. These facts fundamentally change the standing equation: now we know that the NSA isn’t surveilling only its targets, but it’s instead surveilling everyone, looking for information about those targets. Finally, the volume of the plaintiffs’ international communications is so incredibly large that there is simply no way the government could conduct upstream surveillance without sweeping up a substantial number of those communications. In short, the plaintiffs in Wikimedia v. NSA have standing because the NSA is copying and searching substantially all international text-based communications, including theirs.

If its content, its not metadata, so all the rationalizations about metadata go out the window. We're talking about US to foreign traffic. Although the border search exemption is extremely broad, allowing for this would undermine all the rationalizations from the courts over the years that there is some limit to it. Whats that leave?

1. Richard Posner's fucked up argument that the 4th Amendment doesn't prohibit robots from watching you because they don't have emotions.

2. The idea that there is a general "intelligence collection" exception to the fourth amendment.

3, The idea that the Constitution requires the exact minimization procedures that happen to be in place. How prescient of them.

Either way, it'll be fun to watch.

Wikimedia v. NSA: Standing and the Fight for Free Speech and Privacy | Just Security


In NSA-intercepted data, those not targeted far outnumber the foreigners who are - The Washington Post

There have been so many useless Snowden disclosures that I didn't notice this. This is important, primarily because of the assurances that all the data is extremely difficult to access without authorization.

“He didn’t get this data,” Alexander told a New Yorker reporter. “They didn’t touch —”

“The operational data?” the reporter asked.

“They didn’t touch the FISA data,” Alexander replied. He added, “That database, he didn’t have access to.”

Yes, he did...

In NSA-intercepted data, those not targeted far outnumber the foreigners who are - The Washington Post


 
 
Powered By Industrial Memetics
RSS2.0