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Steve Jobs: The Rolling Stone Interview

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Steve Jobs: The Rolling Stone Interview
Topic: Macintosh 11:58 pm EST, Dec  9, 2003

] He changed the computer industry. Now he's after the
] music business

A mixed bag of clue and deception.

He is dead on about electronic copy-protection, and the quality of file sharing services.

He is dead wrong about subscription based services. Cable companies, Netflix, XM... There are many examples of media subscription services. The advantage that these services might offer consumers is the ability to branch out and try different music with less risks. There is a real business there. Job's model is better for him because it is more conducive to selling hardware devices like ipods. Subscriptions are for streams.

His comment about copyright itself is nice in that he used the word invest rather then the word create. The funny thing is that he makes the argument about the need for investment, and then he undoes the argument by saying that the core problem with the music industry is that it invests too much! The fact is that improving technology has greatly reduced the need for investment, at least from a production and distribution standpoint. The only thing missing is marketing. If you can get to the point where a lot of people are listening to your music without really needing lots of capital, the question is whether you'll need the music industry when you get there.

He is wrong about VOD. Does my TIVO give me instant gratification? Why should I wait 24 hours for the next Simpsons episode when I can download it in 5?

Steve Jobs: The Rolling Stone Interview



 
 
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