Create an Account
username: password:
 
  MemeStreams Logo

Twice Filtered

search

noteworthy
Picture of noteworthy
My Blog
My Profile
My Audience
My Sources
Send Me a Message

sponsored links

noteworthy's topics
Arts
  Literature
   Fiction
   Non-Fiction
  Movies
   Documentary
   Drama
   Film Noir
   Sci-Fi/Fantasy Films
   War
  Music
  TV
   TV Documentary
Business
  Tech Industry
  Telecom Industry
  Management
Games
Health and Wellness
Home and Garden
Miscellaneous
  Humor
  MemeStreams
   Using MemeStreams
Current Events
  War on Terrorism
  Elections
  Israeli/Palestinian
Recreation
  Cars and Trucks
  Travel
   Asian Travel
Local Information
  Food
  SF Bay Area Events
Science
  History
  Math
  Nano Tech
  Physics
  Space
Society
  Economics
  Education
  Futurism
  International Relations
  History
  Politics and Law
   Civil Liberties
    Surveillance
   Intellectual Property
  Media
   Blogging
  Military
  Philosophy
Sports
Technology
  Biotechnology
  Computers
   Computer Security
    Cryptography
   Human Computer Interaction
   Knowledge Management
  Military Technology
  High Tech Developments

support us

Get MemeStreams Stuff!


 
There are great benefits to connectedness, but we haven't wrapped our minds around the costs.

the nexus of the information universe
Topic: Miscellaneous 7:42 am EST, Jan 29, 2015

Assaf Regev:

Of the 2.3 billion smartphones around the globe, Kindsight Security estimates that 40 percent of them contain spyware used to monitor the phone's owner by tracking the device's location, incoming and outgoing calls, text messages, email, Web browsing and history.

Natasha Singer:

Verizon is now at the forefront of telecommunications companies selling intelligence about their customers to advertisers. The ad-targeting experiments by Verizon and AT&T are striking examples of the data-mining opportunities open to phone carriers now that they have become the nexus of the information universe, providing a connection to the Internet for people anywhere they go, at any time.

Jonathan Mayer:

There are widespread collateral consequences from Turn's zombie cookie.

EFF:

Eighteen pages of amendments to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill would grant the UK government sweeping new powers to compel telecommunications companies to harvest and store data collected on their users, and for police and intelligence companies to obtain and analyze that data without warrants or effective oversight.

Qualys:

The GHOST vulnerability is a serious weakness in the Linux glibc library. It allows attackers to remotely take complete control of the victim system without having any prior knowledge of system credentials.

During our testing, we developed a proof-of-concept in which we send a specially created e-mail to a mail server and can get a remote shell to the Linux machine. This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.

The first vulnerable version of the GNU C Library affected by this is glibc-2.2, released on November 10, 2000.

Jen Ellis:

We are frequently more comfortable pointing out weakness and failures than recommending solutions. We must move beyond this if our industry is to survive, and if we ever hope to create a more secure ecosystem.

Zuo Xiaodong, vice president of the China Information Security Research Institute:

We're under the yoke of others. ... We're breaking away from these types of circumstances.


your true calling is gaming the system
Topic: Miscellaneous 7:32 am EST, Jan 29, 2015

Mat Honan:

The problem with building your organization around a person is that people can leave -- and then you're screwed.

Marco Arment:

It should be troubling if a lot of people are staying ... because everything else is worse, not necessarily because they love it.

The Economist:

For the past 20 years, and bucking previous trends, the workers who are now working the longest hours and juggling the most responsibilities at home also happen to be among the best educated and best paid. The so-called leisure class has never been more harried.

Horace Dediu:

I've often said that corporate governance is medieval, or pre-scientific in its approach to understanding causality. That may be too generous.

Paul Graham:

What should you do if your true calling is gaming the system? Management consulting.

Homa Mojtabai:

We'd really like to see you take on more of a leadership role before we pay you for being a leader.

James Tour:

My job is to inspire them and provide a credit card, and direct them away from rabbit holes.

One exasperated AVP:

UNIX was never a deliverable!

Daniel Engber:

Support the slacker --- or better yet, be a slacker. Take some extra time. Stay home. That's how we can show that it's O.K. to take it easy, and that a happy, healthy life needn't be a source of shame.


impressed by the imperturbable discipline with which the Chinese had executed their idiotic instructions
Topic: Miscellaneous 7:31 am EST, Jan 29, 2015

David Carr:

What is it about our current reality that is so insufficient that we feel compelled to augment or improve it?

Lisa Moore:

It has always been this way. Finite. But at forty-five you realize it.

Andrew Sullivan:

Some things are worth cherishing precisely because they are finite. Things cannot go on for ever. I learned this in my younger days: it isn't how long you live that matters. What matters is what you do when you're alive.

Scott Long:

In real life, solidarity takes many forms, almost all of them hard. Solidarity is hard because it isn't about imaginary identifications, it's about struggling across the canyon of not being someone else ...

Chas Freeman:

Each confessed that he had seen both his own and his counterpart's behavior as a waste of time. But the Brit confided that he'd been impressed by the imperturbable discipline with which the Chinese had executed their idiotic instructions. And, for their part, the Chinese said they'd secretly admired the exquisite one-upmanship with which the Brits had greeted them on a mission whose absurdity and futility they fully appreciated.


they may say they don't need it, but they do, they do
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:50 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Nicky Perry:

Things in the world are bad enough as it is, and now you're going to take away our chocolate?

Anne Penketh:

A French court has barred a couple from naming their daughter Nutella after the popular hazelnut chocolate spread.

Diana Vreeland:

We all need a splash of bad taste. No taste is what I'm against.

Molly Young:

Every girl deserves prizes.

Tim Harford:

You might feel that it's awkward and unnecessary to ask what gift would be welcome but the recipient of the gift sees things differently and would prefer that you asked rather than guessed.

Ed Sheeran:

I love cleaning, that's my thing.

Mallory Ortberg as Ayn Rand:

I believe more movies should be made about enterprising young boys who are given factories.

John MacGaffin:

What man would say no to Claire Danes?

Christina Hendricks:

No man should be on Facebook.

Ben Casnocha:

A lot of alpha males say they don't need the flattery or deference when in fact they do.


as time passed, they looked stupider and stupider
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:50 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Jill Lepore:

Last year, BuzzFeed deleted more than four thousand of its staff writers' early posts, apparently because, as time passed, they looked stupider and stupider.

Werner Herzog:

Learn to live with your mistakes.

Owen Li:

I acted overzealously, causing you devastating losses for which there is no excuse.

Morgan Stanley:

It has been determined that certain account information of approximately 900 clients, including account names and numbers, was briefly posted on the Internet. Morgan Stanley detected this exposure and the information was promptly removed.


existence proof
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:50 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Dave Winer:

A good blog exists independently of people reading it. Even if no one read my blog, I'd still write it.

Matt Mullenweg:

Blog just for two people. First, write for yourself, both your present self whose thinking will be clarified by distilling an idea through writing and editing, and your future self who will be able to look back on these words and be reminded of the context in which they were written. Second, write for a single person who you have in mind as the perfect person to read what you write, almost like a letter, even if they never will, or a person who you're sure will read it because of a connection you have to them.


the fire inside
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:50 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Scott Weiss:

There's a final class of company that I'm focused on in the security space. I would describe this as a counter-measures company: How do we turn the tables on the attacker? It's part of the growing sense in the security industry that if we don't fight fire with fire, we'll just get burned.

Ben Casnocha:

There are going to be fires all over the place. Keep it simple: just focus on the one, most important fire.


choosing it changes everything
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:49 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Nick Paumgarten:

What was worth saving? Not as much as you'd anticipated ... Pile up those mine carts with fool's gold. The thing that's worth keeping is the thing you do next.

Andre Agassi:

Even if it's not your ideal life, you can always choose it. No matter what your life is, choosing it changes everything.

Mark Mann:

One in five Americans plans to buy a fitness tracker in 2015.

Ben Casnocha:

The most importance choice of all is who you choose to surround yourself with.

Daniel Engber:

Instead of raging at officemates who try too hard, praise the ones who do their part to slow the rat race down.

Ben Casnocha:

Every decision has tradeoffs: when you choose to do one thing it means you choose not to do some other thing.


a place less distinctive and eight more
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:49 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Virginie Tisseau:

I ride the tram because every day it takes me to a place less familiar.

Nick Paumgarten:

If you're the type to count the steps you take each morning on the trek from apartment to subway platform (third I-beam in, rear car), and then on to lobby and desk, you find that the number hardly varies. After a while, you stop looking around.

Tyler Cowen:

When I visited Santa Monica in January it struck me how much it reminded me of ... Arlington. Arlington and Santa Monica have never been more alike, or less distinctive.

David Kolb, on sprawl:

Are we imprisoned in a universal Disneyland?

Sarah Perry:

The American urban design pattern is characterized by, first, an orientation toward the automobile above all else; second, toward consumption as the main activity besides work; and third, toward efficient human storage. Human activities other than consumption and "being stored" -- as in day cares, schools, prisons, offices, nursing homes, and "housing units" themselves -- are made difficult and uncomfortable by the physical built environment itself. Religious activity and social activity, two main components of human flourishing that transform local environments, are increasingly rare and emptied of transformative power.


it was acceptable in those days
Topic: Miscellaneous 5:49 am EST, Jan 27, 2015

Nick Paumgarten:

Before 4 Times Square and the decade or so at 20 West Forty-third Street, the magazine spent more than fifty years at 25 West Forty-third Street. It was acceptable in those days to pass a woman on the street and say, "Great hat."

L.P. Hartley:

The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.

Liliana Segura, in 2014:

The truth is, yes, even "hello" can feel like an unwelcome demand.

Clarinda Harriss:

The Tragedy of Hats is that you can never see the one you're wearing,
that no one believes the lies they tell,
that they grow to be more famous than you,
that you could die in one but you won't be buried in it.


<< 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 ++ 15 >> Older (First)
 
 
Powered By Industrial Memetics
RSS2.0